Jenn McKinlay

New York Times Bestselling Author


"Interesting, likable, and memorable characters, a picturesque New England town, and a murder as sticky as an intricate decoupage plaque will keep you turning pages in Lucy Lawrence's charming new mystery."

-- Sally Goldenbaum, author of the Seaside Knitters Mystery series

STUCK ON MURDER

The word 'decoupage' is derived from the French 'decouper', which means to cut out.

Chapter One

“Whatever is she doing?” Ella Porter whispered to her twin sister Marie.

“Darned if I know,” she said.

The elderly women were standing on the sidewalk in front of Vintage Papers, watching Brenna Miller unload a large box from the back of her Jeep.

She was a pretty girl with long, curly auburn hair that she wore tied in a band at the nape of her neck. Tall and fair, with a dusting of freckles across her nose that made her look younger than she was, Brenna was known for being generous with her smiles. The Porter sisters liked her well enough, but she was not a local, which caused her to be the object of much of their speculation.

The sisters observed, with their identical eyebrows raised in bewilderment, as Brenna shut the back hatch of her car and pressed her key chain fob until the Jeep gave a rude honk.

Ella started and Marie tsked.

“Is that really necessary?” Marie asked Ella.

“Truly, what does she think will happen here in Morse Point?” Ella agreed. “Why, we’ve lived here all of our sixty-eight years and we’ve never locked our car or our house.”

“Well, I heard Tenley Morse telling Matt Collins that Brenna’s never lived in a small town before,” Marie said. “She used to live in Boston. I imagine it’s very different there.”

Ella shuddered. She didn’t even like to leave her own zip code never mind venture all the way to Boston.

As Brenna walked by, carting the big box in her arms, both ladies gave her a big smile as if they hadn’t just been talking about her.

Brenna grinned. She knew full well that the Porter twins were gossiping about her. They were known around Morse Point as the keepers of the bodies, as in they knew where they were all buried.